Major Changes to Exempt Status under the FLSA

Published on 6/17/2016
Categories: DOL, Exempt, FLSA

clock-1426621_640 The Department of Labor (DOL) has made some pervasive changes to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) which will affect the minimum salary requirement for employees to be considered Exempt from overtime.

As of December 1, 2016 the DOL has raised the minimum salary for administrative, professional, and executive positions from $23,660 to $47,476 to be qualified for Exempt status under the FLSA’s minimum wage and overtime requirements.  Highly Compensated Employees must be paid a minimum of $134,004 per year.  This applies to all employers no matter how small.

In addition, the Department of Labor will adjust this base salary  for administrative, professional, executive, and highly compensated employees.  Also, there are still no salary level requirements for outside sales, teachers, doctors and lawyers. Read more…

Misconduct Expanded in Recent Update of Unemployment Insurance Act

Published on 6/10/2016
Categories: Illinois Law, Unemployment

On December 4, 2015, House Bill 1285 was signed into law, codifying how the industry defined employee misconduct for purposes of unemployment insurance claims. With the new legislation, the question becomes whether the clarified misconduct violations will automatically bar a former employee from obtaining unemployment benefits.

Prior to House Bill 1285, an employee was ineligible for unemployment benefits if he or she committed egregious acts such as committing a theft or felony, for work-related misconduct, out of work because of a labor dispute, or if the employee quit voluntarily without good cause. Illinois Appellate Courts have held that a policy did not need to be written or even articulated in circumstances where the behavior violates a policy which is self-evident, such as stealing, Ray v. IDES, 244 Ill. App. 3d 233 (1st Dist. 1993) or fighting, Bandemer v. IDES, 204 Ill. App. 3d 192 (1st Dist. 1990). However, in situations where the misconduct was not specifically addressed in employer policies, proof of warnings to the misconduct that violated the policy was required. See Zuaznabar v. Bd. of Review, 257 Ill. App. 3d 354, 358 (1st Dist. 1993) Read more…

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